Our Blog

We support our clients and their stakeholders to press pause, reconsider the future they want and help build the awareness and capacity to get there. Everything we do or say is an invitation to reconsider the present and to consider new futures.

How to develop core strength at pace

As a recent AIESEC alumnus, it is very interesting, though not surprising, to see the speed at which the global […]

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Lessons from stone sculptures

What can we learn from the 15,800-mile saga of a ton of African stone art… about working across sectors, about mutual understanding and about economic development in the global South?

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A course of action

A course of action At the crossroads I stared down all the roads and saw More crossroads. What does any […]

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Why organisational cultures are like reindeer

I’ve just returned from Estonia, where I was delivering a keynote on leadership (I decided to focus it on three […]

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Connecting Silos: The Missing Link

Improving regularity of communications, tightening role descriptions, clarifying products and plans… Do these sound like tried and tested actions to solve communication and accountability issues across silos within a business? In this article, Tim uses his experience from working with a particular client to suggest that these actions alone are hardly sufficient and provides insight into making your efforts more effective.

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How to get agile without losing participation? Our latest experiment

Realising that your own organisation has started to drift can be a sobering experience for any executive team. For Future Considerations, this sparked a continuing experiment in organisational design in an effort to maximise contribution, make the best decisions and enhance learning, both for ourselves and for our clients. Mark sets the scene in this article and outlines the most recent developments in the evolution of our own company.

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Overcoming inclusion paralysis – generating involvement with efficiency

Ensuring decision buy-in from team members can be one of the most difficult tasks a leader has to face and often a choice emerges to include no one, or include everyone. Cari reflects on the first step as to how teams who operate with a freedom-centred (or democratic) ethos work with and address this idea of “including everyone”.

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